A Sampling of Block Printed Art Quilts

Posts in Judy’s March Artist for The Printed Fabric Bee series:

  1. Block Printing Intro
  2. Creating and Embellishing Block Printed Textiles
  3. A Sampling of Block Printed Art Quilts

In my last post I promised that I would conclude my stint as the March artist by showing off some of the quilts that I’ve made (alone or collaborating with other artists) using wooden printing blocks.

Several years ago Artistic Artifacts hosted the talented British textile artist Jamie Malden, owner of Colouricious, for a block printing workshop. Jamie’s time in town coincided with a visit from Liz Kettle of Textile Evolution, and so we dedicated some time to work collaboratively. Liz titled her blog post about this creative event “3 Artists + 3 Days = Creative Frenzy” — very apt!

The below quilt was created using the WB12 Orchid block and was bordered and bound with two of our Combanasi batiks, which feature silk screen motifs with traditional batik techniques (view larger image).

Orchid Block Printed Art quilt

Several of the orchid prints were embellished with a variety of hand-stitches using Tentakulum Handpainted Fibers: see detail photo below.

Detail, Orchid Block Printed Art quilt

Our dragonfly quilt features a print from the WB212 DragonflyDragonfly in Wetland square block as the center, accented with hand-dyed fibers and trim. It’s bordered by hand-dyed fabric block printed with a variety of paisleys and florals. (View larger image)

Dragonfly Block Printed Art Quilt

The below quilt uses our large leaf block with white PROfab Opaque Textile Paint, printed atop fabrics that were monoprinted using stencils, bubble wrap and more on a Gelli Arts™ Gel Printing Plate (view larger image). If you haven’t experimented with monoprinting on a Gelli plate, I want to encourage you to give it a try — such a fun surface design technique!

Leaf Block Printed Art Quilt

We used this quilt as the backdrop for our prize package photo. The center is the WB213 Primitive Peacock block on monoprinted fabric, surrounded by fabric collage (monoprints, stamped, etc.) and stitched to a hand-dyed vintage linen piece. The base of this quilt is a hand-dyed commercial black & white fabric; I collect black & white fabrics specifically to dye them! The quilt was accented with beading (view large image).

Peacock Block Printed Art Quilt

In my last post I gave you a glimpse of working on Lutradur to create snowflakes. Visit the Artistic Artifacts blog to learn more about the creation of this quilt. Below is the finished quilt (view larger image).

Snowflake Block Printed Art Quilt

The below is the final assembled result that came after I was inspired by a demonstration during one of our monthly JAMs meetings. That demo led to a LOT of new fans of the process all putting their own spin similar little hand stitch quiltlets.

Slow Stitch Outsider Art Quilt

While I did make some new pieces for this one, the majority of the block prints were collected from the many, many wood block demonstrations I’ve held over the years; in my shop, at quilt shows, etc. I really enjoyed giving these a ‘home’ and having the individual pieces be a portable hand-stitching project (until the final stitching together). Visit my archived blog post for more on my Slow Stitched Outsider Art Quilt, including links to tutorial videos by Teesha Moore.

Last Chance: Leave a Comment for Your Opportunity to Win!

NOTE: Prize has been awarded. One lucky U.S.-based winner will be randomly drawn from the list of all who have commented on these March block printing postings. Comments will be tallied here on my Artistic Artifacts blog as well as on The Printed Fabric Bee blog.

March Printed Fabric Bee prize: wooden printing block, textile paint and foam printing mat

Leave a comment below to be eligible for this block printing prize!

NOTE: Prize has been awarded. My prize package is pictured above: a gorgeous circle design wooden printing block, a foam printing mat, and a jar of PROfab Opaque Textile Paint in the color True Blue.

BUT, if you live near Artistic Artifacts, or are willing to travel to us, you instead have the option to attend my Woodblock Printed Art Quilt class on June 11 for free if you prefer!

The winner will be drawn and notified on Tuesday, April 5th. Good luck to everyone! I’ve enjoyed sharing my wooden printing blocks enthusiasm with you all.

Leaf block printed quilt detail, free motion stitching

Posted in Fiber, Printed Fabric Bee, Quilts, Wooden Printing Blocks | 5 Replies

About Judy

I am a fiber person. I have been involved in fiber art since elementary school. After graduating college with majors in Fashion Design and Business Marketing, I have since learned to weave, sew, dye, stamp, quilt, bead. All those experiences and contacts have bought me to fiber art and mixed media through art quilts and my fiber jewelry. And I inherited the collector gene too - I enjoy hunting and gathering really cool stuff which the casual observer would think has outlived it's usefullness and use it in my art.

5 thoughts on “A Sampling of Block Printed Art Quilts

  1. Beverly Sensabaugh

    Great article! Thanks so much for sharing! I just love the blocks-they are just beautiful!

  2. Katie McGrath

    It’s great to see such a variety of results using the wood blocks. Now I want a bunch of them!

  3. Marcia Rioux

    Hi Judy,
    I have been seeing fiber art, mixed media, textile art, etc, for the past year wondering how
    in the world, not only to make it ,but more so, where do I purchase supplies and get
    instruction for the art. Thanks to you, my search is over!!! I’m amazed at your work! I want to absorb everything having to do with Artistic Artifacts. I actually would just like to sit at your feet!!! I live in Florida so visiting your shop is not convenient. Therefore, any tutorial, online class or written instruction will be
    very much appreciated by me; one of your newest fans.

    You broaden my creative utopian world!

    Marcia Rioux
    Mount Dora, Florida

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