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Mixed Media Collage Cards

Despite all that was on my “to do” list, for some reason on my day off I wanted to make cards. Most of these weren’t even holiday themed, so this impulse was not particularly helpful, but for some reason I just had to do it. (Ever had that happen to you?)

These are little mixed media collages, 4 x 6 inches. I was testing a set of blank mixed media surface cards by Strathmore, using Dylusions Ink Sprays and stencils. I created backgrounds on cards, set aside to dry. Then I stamped over the inks with Stewart Gill Paints in a different color.

Pictured here, I actually painted on the section of the polymer stamp that I wanted to use, Suess Tulips from Kari McKnight Holbrook. These are a large 8 x10 inches, so for the cards I was creating I did not need to use the entire surface. Note to self, when using water-based inks, they will run and create “mud” when you try to paint over them: they mix too much!

Stewart Gill paints applied directly to a large polymer stamp
Stewart Gill paints applied directly to a large polymer stamp
Stewart Gill paints applied directly to a large polymer stamp

Then I found my collection of retro sewing patterns and began cutting out and pasting figures and text from the cover packages.

Collaged mixed media card by Judy Gula of Artistic Artifacts

Collaged mixed media card by Judy Gula of Artistic Artifacts

Collaged mixed media card by Judy Gula of Artistic Artifacts

Selecting strips to weave from the scrap pile

For another type of card, I thought of a way to use up all those narrow strips you end up with from straightening ragged edge fabrics, or pieces trimmed off when wonky piecing. Everyone has that pile of scraps like this one, that feel too good to toss out.

First I created colored backgrounds with Stewart Gill Paints and stencils, as I wanted a clearer background, consisting of one color and pattern. While the cards were drying I took scraps of Australian Aborigine designed fabrics and wove them together in a plain weave (over under one fabric, over under the next). Below is the first row:

Aborigine designed fabric strips ready for weaving

I included the selvages in my weaving. I love the pop of white, snips of text and the color circle graphics being part of the mix.

In progress woven fabric strips

Once the weaving was complete, I used painter’s tape to carefully tape edges the edges, then gently took the woven fabric to the ironing board and laid it right side down on one of my non-stick teflon craft sheets, then applied a layer of Mistyfuse sheer fusible. Using the craft sheet to protect my iron, I gave the weaving a swipe of heat. The fusible held the fabric together so that I could then cut smaller pieces. These smaller segments were then fused to the card using Mistyfuse (with the craft sheet protecting the card from any residue on my iron).

Taping the edges of the woven fabric to keep it together before fusing

Finished woven fabric strip collaged cards by Judy Gula of Artistic Artifacts

Finally, I did get at least a few winter themed cards done, which will be my holiday cards to family. (So that’s one thing off my list after all!) I used fabric scraps, backed with Mistyfuse as described above, and finished off by using my wooden print block in the shape of a snow flake. Those cards are pictured in the bottom row of this assortment:

Completed mixed media collage cards by Judy Gula of Artistic Artifacts

Wishing you all the best for the upcoming holiday season (and getting things checked off YOUR to-do list)!

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About Judy

I am a fiber person. I have been involved in fiber art since elementary school. After graduating college with majors in Fashion Design and Business Marketing, I have since learned to weave, sew, dye, stamp, quilt, bead. All those experiences and contacts have bought me to fiber art and mixed media through art quilts and my fiber jewelry. And I inherited the collector gene too - I enjoy hunting and gathering really cool stuff which the casual observer would think has outlived it's usefullness and use it in my art.

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